Cape Point Vineyards Woolworths Limited Release Sauvignon Blanc 2009

By , 25 March 2011

Cape Point Vineyards Woolworths Limited Release Sauvignon Blanc 2009, Cape Point Vineyards Woolworths Limited Release Sauvignon Blanc 2009

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Cape Point Vineyards Woolworths Limited Release Sauvignon Blanc 2009, Cape Point Vineyards Woolworths Limited Release Sauvignon Blanc 2009

Dry but you can drink it.

A cracking wine showing a range of aromas and flavours from grassy-green through to ripe granadilla with bright but not harsh acidity. Pure fruited and not as “nervy” as I suspect it was on release.

It rated 5 Stars in Platter’s 2010, where it got this rather fanciful description: “Minerality is the seam binding in [this wine] binding it together, but the nuances enthrall: oyster shell, crushed leaves, the list goes on. Poised & toned, with unwavering length”.

Have to confess I find the use of “minerality” as a wine descriptor particularly irksome. I’m prepared to accept other tasters using it when they are referring to the sensation similar to “sucking on a pebble after a long route march” but beyond that not very helpful, just like “flinty”, “chalky” and “gravelly” are not very helpful. If you’ve been eating dirt too often, you’ve got a problem.

Comments

4 comment(s)

  • Danie Pretorius25 March 2011

    Everyone these days seems to produce Sauvignons infused with minerality from their cool/er climate vines.  Yawn.

  • elias25 March 2011

    even robertson/bonnievale talks about a sea breeze, do they get it through the du toitskloof tunnel???

  • Christian25 March 2011

    For a good article on the the problematic nature of minerality in wine written by Sally Easton MW, see http://www.winewisdom.com/articles/minerality-again/ (Thanks for Arco Laarman of Glen Carlou for directing me to this via Twitter).

  • Kwispedoor25 March 2011

    I don’t think that minerality as a wine descriptor is that problematic (misused and over-used, certainly). The origins of it might be muddy waters (figuratively, of course), but minerally aromas and tastes in certain wines can’t be denied. Also, one can taste/smell cigar box on a Cabernet without ever having chomped on a humidor. One can also taste/ smell grenadilla on a Sauvignon without the soil or vine containing trace elements of it. I actually find some minerally descriptors very helpful at times – for example I’ve picked Black Oystercatcher out in blind tastings due to the gravelly character some of their wines display. I had a sandpit when I grew up though so, before I figured out how to use a cork screw, I might have done more terroir sucking than your average little kid.

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